Aliyya Swaby, ProPublica

Aliyya Swaby

ProPublica

Atlanta, GA, United States

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Recent:
  • Unknown
Past:
  • ProPublica
  • Texas Tribune
  • KBTX News

Past articles by Aliyya:

COVID-19 Hit This County Hard. A Weakened Health Department Still Can’t Get People Vaccinated.

Clayton County has the highest percentage of Black residents in Georgia and the lowest vaccination rate in the metro Atlanta area. Amid widespread community mistrust, a strained health department struggles to figure out what to do next. → Read More

Texas teachers, child care workers now eligible for COVID-19 vaccine

State health officials told providers about the change in eligibility the day after the Biden administration urged all states to prioritize teachers for vaccines. → Read More

Texas schools still tallying storm costs, and some won't reopen soon

School districts report flooded classrooms and gyms, and teachers have lost supplies and learning materials. The damage is further disrupting a school year already upended by the pandemic. → Read More

Texas Republicans want to keep transgender women out of women’s school sports teams

Lawmakers have filed legislation that would ban transgender girls and women who attend public K-12 schools, colleges and universities from playing on single-sex sports teams designated for girls and women. → Read More

Listen: She’s tutoring her siblings while learning remotely. How one Texas high school senior navigates the pandemic.

Spend a day with Isabel Suarez, an 18-year-old Pflugerville High School senior who's taking on the challenges of virtual school as well as tutoring her two younger siblings during the pandemic. → Read More

Alarming failure rates among Texas students fuel calls to get them back into classrooms

Most schools hoped this fall would see students make up academic ground lost last spring when the pandemic hit. Instead, districts are looking for ways to reverse plummeting grades and attendance among students learning at home. → Read More

Gov. Abbott says local health officials can shut schools only in limited circumstances

Abbott said local health authorities can't shut down in-person instruction before school has even started. He said an outbreak on campus once students have arrived could prompt a closure by health authorities. → Read More

Custodians, cafeteria workers and bus drivers also fear returning to Texas schools

Texas schools employ almost as many support staff members as they do teachers, often in hourly or part-time jobs with low pay. The state has offered limited guidance on how to protect them on the job. → Read More

Texas will allow schools to keep classrooms closed longer than previously ordered

Facing backlash from educators, parents and public health officials, the Texas Education Agency is giving schools more time before they must resume teaching students in person, and allowing districts hard hit by the coronavirus to seek waivers. → Read More

Texas will extend time that schools will be allowed to stay online-only, Gov. Greg Abbott says

Schools had previously been told that they would need to limit online-only instruction to the first three weeks of the school year, or they'd lose state funding. → Read More

Texas police using tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters incites more violence, experts say

Organizers and protesters say the use of force by police during protests in Texas cities highlights the underlying discord between law enforcement and residents that underpinned the protests in the first place. → Read More

Texas parents struggle to find child care, food as school closings keep kids at home

Lower-income households are being hit the hardest by school closings as parents try to hang on to jobs and care for their children. Districts are cobbling together ways to keep their educations on track. → Read More

Houston school district asks federal judge to put the brakes on likely state takeover

Houston ISD lawyers told a federal judge the education commissioner is exceeding his authority, and asked for a preliminary injunction stopping him from booting out the elected school board of the state's largest district. → Read More

State to take over Houston ISD by replacing school board and superintendent

Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath informed Houston ISD of those plans in a letter Wednesday. He also sent letters saying the state would take over Shepherd and Snyder ISDs. → Read More

This school district has been at risk of state takeover for years. Some blame white flight.

In a 2003 lawsuit, Hearne Independent School District officials said the state's failure to stop white students from transferring to a nearby district contributed to their academic struggles. → Read More

Austin ISD sex ed battle could be preview of state-level debate

Austin ISD's contentious board meeting comes months before the State Board of Education revises its curriculum standards on sex education. → Read More

Hear how this Texas school district found itself at risk of returning to a segregated past

A new audio series, a collaboration between The Texas Tribune and 1A, explores why students of color in Longview ISD still don't have the same educational opportunities as white students. → Read More

Texas is paying more for full-day pre-K. But some school districts are delaying.

How are Texas school districts using state pre-K funding to expand educational options for 3- and 4-year-olds? It depends where you look. → Read More

Three Texas school districts face state penalties after getting failing grades. Look up your campus' A-F grade here.

Houston ISD, the state's largest school district, is among those that could have its school board taken over by the state, due to consecutive low ratings of one of its schools. → Read More

Texas tried to incentivize school districts to work with charters. Districts are turning to local nonprofits instead.

Not many school districts are partnering with charter schools, in some cases because they know it wouldn't be politically palatable in their communities. → Read More