Dan Charles, NPR

Dan Charles

NPR

Washington, DC, United States

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Recent:
  • NPR
Past:
  • WBUR
  • knkx public radio
  • KTOO

Recent articles by Dan:

NPR

Farmers Are Warming Up To The Fight Against Climate Change

Several big farm groups, traditionally hostile to environmental regulations, are now working with environmental advocates in support of farmer-friendly actions to reduce carbon emissions. → Read More

NPR

Farmworkers Say The Government Is Trying To Cut Their Wages

Farmworker advocates are accusing the U.S. Department of Agriculture of trying to cut the wages of farmworkers who come to the U.S. on temporary guest worker visas. → Read More

NPR

As Biotech Crops Lose Their Power, Scientists Push For New Restrictions

Some of the first GMOs – corn and cotton plants that have been genetically modified to fend off insects – are running into problems. Bugs have become resistant to them because they've been overused. → Read More

NPR

Fighting Climate Change, One Building At A Time

To end climate change, millions of homes will have to stop heating with fossil fuels. It's possible, and can even save money. Entrepreneur Donnel Baird is trying to make it happen. → Read More

NPR

How To Have Your Solar Farm And Keep Your Regular Farm, Too

Large-scale solar farms are running into opposition from people who want to save farmland. Now solar companies are trying to combine solar and farming. → Read More

NPR

In Arkansas, Backlash Against Pesticide Regulation Gets Personal

A state official in Arkansas who's led a national effort to limit damage from a controversial herbicide has recently found his tractors damaged and hay bales burned. → Read More

NPR

How Trump's Food Box Initiative Overpaid And Underdelivered

The Trump administration has been buying food from farmers and getting it to food banks. Food banks, however, say the program was not set up to deliver food efficiently. → Read More

NPR

A Prophet Of Soil Gets His Moment Of Fame

Rattan Lal, an Indian-born scientist, has devoted his career to finding ways to capture carbon from the air and store it in soil. Today, that idea has a catchy name: regenerative agriculture. → Read More

NPR

Food Is Growing More Plentiful, So Why Do People Keep Warning Of Shortages?

For more than a century, food has been getting more abundant, and cheaper. Yet people keep worrying about food shortages. Some economists say the fears actually create their own problems. → Read More

NPR

Big-Money Investors Gear Up For A Trillion-Dollar Bet On Farm Land

A trillion dollars worth of American farmland will change hands in the coming years. Wealthy investors are likely to buy more of it, with the power to shape rural communities and the environment. → Read More

NPR

How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

America's vast fields of corn and soybeans have displaced wildlife and polluted waterways. Farmers could help solve those problems, but often don't, in part because they rent that land. → Read More

NPR

Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

Some major environmental problems in the U.S. stem from using vast tracts of land to grow agricultural crops. But farmers are often limited to reduce that damage because they don't own the land. → Read More

NPR

Farmers Find Ways To Save Millions Of Pigs From Being Euthanized

When COVID-19 infections forced pork companies to close processing plants, some farmers predicted that it would force them to euthanize millions of hogs. The actual number has been much lower. → Read More

NPR

Food Banks Get The Love, But SNAP Does More To Fight Hunger

The charitable organizations called food banks are getting a lot of attention and donations right now. But they aren't nearly as important or effective as SNAP, formerly known as food stamps. → Read More

NPR

Another Pork Plant Shuts Down Amid Coronavirus Outbreak

Tyson Foods is halting work at a processing site in Waterloo, Iowa, because people have tested positive for the virus. Other plants also have closed, cutting U.S. pork production by about a quarter. → Read More

NPR

How One City Mayor Forced A Pork Giant To Close Its Virus-Stricken Plant

Smithfield Foods didn't want to stop slaughtering hogs at its Sioux Falls pork plant, even after hundreds of workers got sick with the coronavirus. Then the city's mayor forced the company's hand. → Read More

NPR

Meat Processing Plants Suspend Operations After Workers Fall Ill

Several processing plants in the U.S. are sitting idle this week because workers are sick with the coronavirus. Other facilities are still operating, but fewer workers are showing up. → Read More

NPR

FACT CHECK: Premature — Trump Continues To Claim Drug Can Treat Coronavirus

Lab studies have shown hydroxychloroquine has blocked the coronavirus from entering cells, but scientists have not reported results yet of whether it can work as a treatment. → Read More

NPR

Food Shortages? Nope, Too Much Food In The Wrong Places

Some Americans, fearing food shortages from COVID-19, have cleaned out supermarket shelves. Yet there's too much food in some places. Farmers are dumping milk and vegetables that they can't sell. → Read More

NPR

Medicare For All Coronavirus Patients? But Who Exactly Qualifies?

The Trump administration decided against opening special window for Affordable Care Act sign ups. "It's like they're twisting themselves into pretzels to avoid anything" Obamacare, said one. → Read More