Lauren Young, Science Friday

Lauren Young

Science Friday

New York, NY, United States

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Recent:
  • Unknown
Past:
  • Science Friday
  • Atlas Obscura
  • Inverse

Past articles by Lauren:

How You Can Dive Into Cephalopod Week 2019

Like a cuttlefish emerging from its sandy hideaway, Cephalopod Week is back for its sixth year. → Read More

The Mass Extinction Detectives — Methods

No one knows how the dinosaurs rose to dominate the planet. But the answers may lie within a mysterious mass extinction that wiped out their competition. → Read More

The Mass Extinction Detectives — Methods

No one knows how the dinosaurs rose to dominate the planet. But the answers may lie within a mysterious mass extinction that wiped out their competition. → Read More

What's It Like To Dig Up Fossils With Paleontologists?

Science Friday treks with paleontologists on a fossil dig in Utah’s dusty canyons. → Read More

Welcome To Oceans Month

Throughout the month of June, we'll dive into the science of the deep. → Read More

Get To Know These Meteorites

Learn about stories of the early solar system with these handy meteorite trading cards. → Read More

The Real Scientific Revolution Behind 'Frankenstein'

Mary Shelley’s classic novel was written in a world where the dead twitched. → Read More

Data Reawakening

As archivists struggle to store the mountain of data on the internet, researchers are trying to use atoms, diamonds, and DNA to let data live on forever. → Read More

The Glittery Jewels Of The Bee World

Tiny bees, like the sweat bee, are more than just dazzling creatures—they are important pollinators. → Read More

The Marvelous, Misunderstood Lives Of Common Spiders

These eight-legged crawlers have an unnecessarily bad rap. → Read More

John Steinbeck And The Mystery Of The Humboldt Squid

In 1940, John Steinbeck helped catalog wildlife in the Sea of Cortez. Now, a new creature lurks beneath the ultramarine waters. → Read More

A Physicist Explains The Shimmering Science Behind Auroras

How are auroras like polar glitter bombs? → Read More

What Is The March For Science?

A conversation on Reddit has grown into over 500 satellite marches worldwide. → Read More

Where to Find Wildflowers? Experts Weigh In

Tips for finding wildflowers and planting your own. → Read More

Rainy Day? Microbes May Be at Play

A closer look at how some species of airborne bacteria can influence precipitation and lightning. → Read More

This Map Charts the Complex Landscape of an Artist's Face

In 1973, the Israeli artist Michael Druks created an unconventional self-portrait. → Read More

A Centuries-Old Malaysian Puppet Show Puts a New Spin on Star Wars

Southeast Asia has a long history practicing wayang kulit, or shadow puppetry. Dating as early as the 800s, the art, found in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Cambodia is considered one of the oldest forms of freestanding puppetry. These intricate, beautiful rod puppets, crafted out of softwood and animal hide, have been used to tell centuries-old tales, Hindu mythology, and Balinese sagas.… → Read More

When Batgirl Saved the Day and Demanded Equal Pay For Women

Batgirl has had enough with the jokes about her salary. In the 1973 clip above, archived by the U.S. National Archives, the characters Batman and Robin from the 1960s Batman television series are strapped to a pole and await their demise from a ticking time bomb. Batgirl bursts onto the scene, strikes a power pose, and then proceeds to admonish the trapped men. As one of Batman’s crime fighting… → Read More

A Visual Guide to the Fake Fleets and Inflatable Armies of World War II

Military units in both the Allied and Axis powers used air-filled tanks and straw airplanes to deceive enemies. → Read More

When Bowling Was a Sport Reserved for Royalty

King Henry VIII famously banned commoners from participating. → Read More