Rob Neufeld, CITIZEN-TIMES.com

Rob Neufeld

CITIZEN-TIMES.com

Asheville, NC, United States

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Recent:
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Past:
  • CITIZEN-TIMES.com

Past articles by Rob:

Visiting Our Past: Thomas Clingman, leading Buncombe secessionist, was all business

Thomas Lanier Clingman, a champion arguer, came to Buncombe from Surry County in 1836. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Ramsey's 1962 lectures served up history with a gamey taste

D. Hiden Ramsey was skeptical about politics, the "nastiness" of which (his phrase) fed his sense of humor. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: William W. McDowell's life is a history hampered by dead ends

In 1857, William W. McDowell was elected Warden of the Poor in Asheville, and was known for charity. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: When it comes to understanding power, follow the roads

As a clue to how politics works, road building is supreme. When it comes to understanding power, follow the roads. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Daniel Boone and his family found freedom in the mountains of WNC

Daniel Boone made his first connection with Western North Carolina in 1750 in pursuit of game. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: One of those 'Cabins & Castles' is still an Asheville gem

The restoration of the Reed house began with Marge Turcot and her family and continued through subsequent owners. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Prohibition's early arrival in WNC

The Asheville faceoff Oct. 8, 1907, was a landmark event for the prohibition forces. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: A trip back through time along Gash's Creek takes us through a few eras

Visiting our past is not easy when one is bent on knowing what a landscape was like 200 years ago. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: There's more to WNC's Scots than just the Highland Games

Scots were an influential group in the settling of Western North Carolina. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Take a nostalgic walk through Haw Creek

I took a walk down Haw Creek Road the other day — in the year 1936 — and I got to hear some folks talking. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Moonshine chasing, storytelling were gospel for Sheriff Bailey

Jesse James Bailey served as sheriff of Madison County, 1920-22, during Prohibition. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: 'Pepper,' 'Gobbler' and 'Nanner Nose' played baseball for Beacon

Beacon Manufacturing, a blanket-maker up until its closing in 2002, raised spirits not just with jobs, but also with ball play in the wake of the Depression. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Scrap yard prince surveys Depot Street history

Depot Street in the River Arts District in the 1930s was three eras distant from the current renaissance. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Bob Ingle overcame fierce obstacles to launch market in 1963

"Nobody made it in the grocery business in Asheville," bankers told Bob Ingle in 1963. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: In 1828, WNC left Dr. William Blanding in awe of wonders

"How charming is the contemplation on 'home sweet home!'" Blanding begins his outpouring on Aug. 28, 1838, after a climb of five miles in five hours. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Battle over New River's construction divided NC

The story of protecting New River's natural state — and the making of a world of consequences — depended on 14 years of court battles, politics and luck. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: WNC pioneer William Davidson had the mind of a Jefferson

William Davidson built and operated a mill at Davidson's Fort (now the Old Fort area) in the 1770s. He was a scientist-farmer, like Thomas Jefferson. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Time traveling to the top of Grandfather Mountain in 1794

"... breathe the sweet air from the Balsam Groves of the Grandfather, and view their glorious aspect ... you would never say city to me again." → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Drive-ins, hair-dos and rockabilly in the '50s and '60s

The pull of Tunnel Road was great in the 1950s and '60s in Asheville. → Read More

Visiting Our Past: Logging dangers filled our hills

The fatality rate in the logging industry was six times that of other industries in 1913. → Read More