Daniel Rothberg, Nevada Independent

Daniel Rothberg

Nevada Independent

Reno, NV, United States

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Recent:
  • Unknown
Past:
  • Nevada Independent
  • GreenBiz
  • Ensia
  • LasVegasSun.com
  • News Deeply
  • Los Angeles Times

Past articles by Daniel:

Feds set a Jan. 31 deadline for Colorado River drought plan to keep more water in Lake Mead

At a conference in Las Vegas on Thursday, a top federal water manager warned water users that the United States would act if seven states in the Colorado River Basin failed to finish a Drought Contingency Plan by the end of January. → Read More

Patagonia, entering campaign politics for the first time, backs Rosen

An outdoor retailer is endorsing Democratic Sen. Jacky Rosen as part of its first endorsements in a campaign, a new move for a company that has become increasingly active in pushing back on the Trump administration when it comes to the issue of opening more federal public land to development. → Read More

Here comes the sun: Solar plus storage energy solutions get competitive

As the price of the dynamic duo of solar photovoltaic plus battery storage drops rapidly, experts expect to see major market shifts soon. → Read More

Suddenly, solar energy plus storage is giving conventional fuels a run for their money

The increasingly competitive dynamic duo of solar photovoltaic plus battery storage is taking energy markets by storm → Read More

From discovery to extinction: After 650,000 years roaming Nevada, newly discovered toad could be at risk

A proposed geothermal project could damage the toad habitat by pumping billions of gallons of water out from an underground reservoir. → Read More

Farmers Propose Novel Solution to Fight Over Groundwater in Nevada

Diamond Valley in rural Nevada has a critically overdrafted aquifer that supports its farming economy. Some irrigators want to shift to a market-based system to limit pumping, but the community is divided. → Read More

Decades later, Las Vegas pipeline project remains stalled by legal challenges

The Southern Nevada Water Authority isn't sure when it will need to tap water from the northern basins but given growth and changing climate patterns, it wants to decrease ... → Read More

Intensifying heat waves highlight deeper concerns about climate change

The West, known for hot summers, is getting a glimpse of what the future might hold if climate change continues at the current pace. Studies show that greenhouse gas emissions, which alter Earth’s thermodynamics, make heat waves not only more likely but also more severe. → Read More

How solar events affect power generation

In August, a solar eclipse is expected to interfere with solar power in Nevada and several other big producers. Since 2000, the amount of solar hooked into the grid has ... → Read More

Preventing water wars in the West could come down to free market

Throughout the region, from the state level to the local level, water is overallocated. That includes the Colorado River, which serves 40 million people across seven Western states and parts of Mexico. Demand is expected to rise, and questions remain about how water will be valued and portioned out. One ... → Read More

Push to lift uranium mining ban revives tension over nuclear activities

In 2012, President Obama issued a 20-year ban on mining claims near the Grand Canyon. The move halted future uranium extraction projects in the region, a win for ... → Read More

How the tortoise became politicized

The desert tortoise’s lobbyists are well-known to solar developers and the country’s largest utility. They have successfully battled wind farms and rancher Cliven Bundy. As a threatened species, the squat land crawler continually frustrates developers and engages environmentalists as a rallying symbol. After years of litigation, a Virginia-based company confirmed ... → Read More

EPA to leave Las Vegas when lease expires at UNLV in 2020

Officials at the Environmental Protection Agency are crafting plans to move its UNLV lab out of Las Vegas ... → Read More

What happens after Trump’s executive order on national monuments

Using his executive authority, President Donald Trump directed Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke Wednesday to review national monument designations dating back to the Clinton administration. Since the early 1900s, presidents have used a law called the Antiquities Act to create national monuments. But the act is ... → Read More

The local ripple: How Trump's spartan budget could hit Nevada communities

With the Trump administration proposing to cut community grants for programs such as Meals on Wheels, officials in sparsely populated Lyon County are concerned about ... → Read More

EPA directed to evaluate moving LV lab to Alabama, per White House budget doc

The agency’s current lease with UNLV, which began housing the federal research and development lab in 1966, expires in September 2020. The EPA had already planned to ... → Read More

Trump, Western storms cast uncertainty on Colorado River

Last year, the states that pull municipal and agricultural water from the lake, like Nevada, started negotiating a Drought Contingency Plan. Under the agreement, the states would voluntarily reduce Lake Mead intake ... → Read More

Why the West is moving away from coal (even with Trump in office)

President Trump has repeatedly pledged to revive the coal industry by rolling back environmental regulations enacted under the Obama administration. Economists argue that while regulations play a role, competitive fuel alternatives are ... → Read More

Save Red Rock group alleges county sidestepped open-meeting law

In its latest move to block a master-planned community near Red Rock Canyon, a nonprofit group is asking a district court to consider allegations that county officials violated open-meeting law ... → Read More

Nevada’s oil speculators worry about uncertain future

Hydraulic fracturing has been used in conventional drilling since the 1940s, but its use increased in the past several years as other innovations allowed for prospecting in untapped areas. That expansion often has come with controversy, as the practice of blasting chemicals thousands of feet into the ground has been ... → Read More