Kevin D. Williamson, National Review

Kevin D. Williamson

National Review

United Kingdom

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Recent:
  • National Review
Past:
  • Washington Post
  • FEE
  • CNBC
  • The Dallas Morning News

Recent articles by Kevin:

Signs of the Times

The truth about those yard signs advertising diversity and open-mindedness is that all of them really mean the opposite: ‘No Trespassing.’ → Read More

The Descent of Democratic Man

You’d think the Democratic Party would at least throw up some interesting leaders, if not necessarily good ones. Instead, you get Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi, and Chuck Schumer. → Read More

The Circle of Corporate Life

As Facebook stumbles, a reminder: Competition works. → Read More

Joe Manchin Didn’t Kill the Democrats’ Climate Agenda

Joe Manchin has not single-handedly derailed climate-change legislation or anything else — except for Democrats’ attempts to govern as though Republicans did not exist. → Read More

The (Political) Assassination of Joe Biden

Progressives who believe that Joe Biden is Democrats’ problem are fooling themselves. → Read More

Of Course the States May Prohibit Abortion Drugs

Our pro-abortion friends should think twice about the kind of legal fights that they are looking to pick, given that they are on a losing streak. → Read More

I Don’t Think He Thought This Through

Surely the lesson of Uvalde is that you cannot rely on the police to protect you. → Read More

Lessons from the Left’s Implosion

The question for conservatives is whether we intend to take our own ideas seriously and seize this moment, or if we instead prefer to repeat the mistakes that have led progressives to defeat and despair. → Read More

Larry Arnn Is Right about Education Majors

The scandal isn’t that Larry Arnn says these things. The scandal is that these things are true. → Read More

Here Comes Fiscal Armageddon

Fiscal Armageddon is what will happen when the U.S. government’s debt load exceeds its ability to comfortably service that debt. The U.S. government will face a budgetary crisis, possibly a sudden one, and its response to that crisis will create ripples — or a tsunami — across the world economy. → Read More

Triple-Digit Trouble

The $100 fill-up could be the Democrats’ death knell. → Read More

BoJo’s No-Nos and the Comparative Sanity of British Politics

Why it’s so much harder to hold a U.S. president — or a San Francisco D.A. — to account than a U.K. prime minister. → Read More

Joe Biden on Guns: Not Addressing Problem

Biden’s speech had not one word about the actual problem; i.e. the habitual criminals who carry out the overwhelming majority of shootings and murders in our country. → Read More

On Gun Crime, the Problem Is Named ‘Biden’

Hunter Biden broke the very gun law that Joe Biden ‘shepherded through Congress,’ but will never be charged for it. → Read More

Explaining the Gun Debate

There are concrete things that could be done about gun-related violence and that might be more useful than yet another teary-eyed sermon from some tedious parasite seeking political office. → Read More

Death of a Stupid Talking Point

As usual when it comes to the gun debate, our progressive friends could do themselves a favor by learning something about their subject. → Read More

Re: Distasteful Comedy

Ricky Gervais has neither engaged in violence himself nor encouraged violence on the part of others. → Read More

Even Our White Supremacists Aren’t Very Interested in White Supremacy

It’s mostly a hobby for miserable dweebs on the Internet. → Read More

The Buffalo Blame Game

Events such as the one in Buffalo require a serious response, but there is nobody around to provide one, at least not in elected office. → Read More

‘A House Divided’

Bill Maher uses the phrase “a house divided cannot stand,” which he attributes to Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln, of course, did use that phrase — famously. But Lincoln is not the origin of it. → Read More