Rebecca Hersher, NPR

Rebecca Hersher

NPR

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Recent:
  • NPR
Past:
  • WBUR
  • KTOO
  • KUNC

Recent articles by Rebecca:

NPR

Measuring Sea Level Rise From Space

A new satellite, scheduled to launch this weekend, is the latest in a parade of missions to measure sea level rise. As climate reporter Rebecca Hersher explains, it's vital data for scientists trying to understand how global warming is affecting the Earth's oceans. For more, you can also read Rebecca's story, "NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise."Email the show at shortwave@npr.org. → Read More

NPR

NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

Space is the best place — maybe the only place — to get a complete picture of how climate change is affecting the Earth's oceans. And what happens in the ocean does not stay in the ocean. → Read More

NPR

Undisclosed: Fire And Flood Risk In The United States

There have been many climate-related disasters this year, and along with those events come a heavy emotional and financial toll for residents. But what NPR climate reporters Rebecca Hersher and Lauren Sommer have found is that most people don't realize their wildfire or flood risk — and that's putting millions in harm's way.Additional Resources:- Read Lauren and Rebecca's series, Climate Risk… → Read More

NPR

The US And The Paris Climate Agreement: 5 Things To Know

President Trump announced his intention to withdraw from the landmark Paris climate agreement in 2017 and formally notified the United Nations last year. A mandatory yearlong waiting period ended on Wednesday. Of the nearly 200 nations that signed the agreement, the U.S. is the only one to walk away from its promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. NPR science reporter Rebecca Hersher shares… → Read More

NPR

U.S. Officially Leaving Paris Climate Agreement

The United States is the only country to back out of its promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. America has contributed more cumulative carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than any other nation. → Read More

NPR

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

Most landlords are not required to disclose if a property is in a flood plain or has flooded before. That's a big problem in cities where climate change is driving more frequent and severe floods. → Read More

NPR

Living In Harm's Way: Why Most Flood Risk Is Not Disclosed

About 15 million properties in the U.S. are prone to flooding, but patchwork and ineffective disclosure laws mean most people get little to no information about flood risk before they move. → Read More

NPR

Undisclosed: Most Homebuyers And Renters Aren't Warned About Flood Or Wildfire Risk

Wildfires and floods threaten tens of millions of properties in the U.S. But most Americans get little or no information about climate risks when they move. → Read More

NPR

Scientists Confirm Nevada Man Was Infected Twice With Coronavirus

It's the first confirmed case of coronavirus reinfection in the U.S. The case underscores that everyone should be social distancing and wearing masks, including COVID-19 survivors. → Read More

NPR

U.S. Emission Reductions Slowed After Trump Pulled Out Of Paris Accord

China is investing in both coal and renewable energy, the European Union promises to dramatically reduce carbon emissions and the U.S. is leaving the Paris Agreement altogether. What will 2021 hold? → Read More

NPR

Inspector General Slams FEMA Over Repeatedly Flooded Homes

These homeowners are eligible for federal help, but a new report finds that FEMA often fails to provide that assistance. → Read More

NPR

Longtime Climate Science Denier Hired At NOAA

David Legates, a professor whose research has been supported by fossil fuel companies, has been hired for a top position at the federal agency that oversees weather and climate forecasting. → Read More

NPR

Millions Of Pounds Of Extra Pollution Were Released Before Laura Made Landfall

Hurricane Laura hit an area known for its refineries and chemical plants. They released millions of pounds of air pollution when they shut down, and many air monitors are not functioning. → Read More

NPR

Everything Is Unprecedented. Welcome To Your Hotter Earth

Hurricanes, wildfires, heat waves and disease outbreaks are all a preview of our hotter future. Dramatically cutting greenhouse gas emissions would help. → Read More

NPR

Hurricanes Like Laura Are More Likely Because Of Climate Change

Hurricane Laura rapidly intensified before it made landfall. Abnormally hot water in the Gulf of Mexico helped it gain power. → Read More

NPR

Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk. Should They All?

Millions of home listings on Realtor.com now include information about climate change-driven flood risk. But other real estate sites are holding off. → Read More

NPR

Rain, Surge And Wind: How To Understand Your Hurricane Risk

Focus more on water, less on wind and beware the cone of uncertainty. Here's a simple guide for understanding hurricane risks. → Read More

NPR

The Atlantic Is Awash With Far More Plastic Than Previously Thought, Study Finds

A new study suggests there is far more plastic in the Atlantic Ocean than scientists estimated earlier, especially tiny pieces of plastic that can end up inside fish and other animals. → Read More

NPR

Everyone Loves The Chat Box: How Climate Science Moved Online

Scientists from around the world are writing the next major United Nations climate report. Summarizing the state of the atmosphere without meeting in person is as hard as it sounds. → Read More

NPR

Air Quality Disparities Persist Despite Overall Gains

A new study finds that the U.S. places with the most polluted air in the 1980s remain the most polluted today. Poor people and people of color are more likely to live in places with dirty air. → Read More