Rebecca Hersher, NPR

Rebecca Hersher

NPR

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Recent:
  • NPR
  • WBUR
Past:
  • KTOO
  • KUNC

Recent articles by Rebecca:

NPR

Climate change makes storms like Ian more common

Abnormally hot water in the Gulf of Mexico helped Hurricane Ian gain strength. Rapidly intensifying major hurricanes are more likely as the Earth gets hotter. → Read More

Climate change makes storms like Ian more common

Abnormally hot water in the Gulf of Mexico helped Hurricane Ian gain strength. Rapidly intensifying major hurricanes are more likely as the Earth gets hotter. → Read More

NPR

One Park. 24 Hours.

It's easy to take city parks for granted, or to think of them as separate from nature and from the Earth's changing climate. But the place where many of us come face-to-face with climate change is our local park. On today's episode, Ryan Kellman and Rebecca Hersher from NPR's Climate Desk team up with Short Wave producer Margaret Cirino to spend 24 hours in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. → Read More

NPR

Why Latinos are on the front lines of climate change

A wide range of Latino communities in the United States are affected by climate-driven storms, floods, droughts and heat waves, and are leading the charge to address global warming. → Read More

NPR

Climate change likely helped cause deadly Pakistan floods, scientists find

Extremely heavy rain fell in the hardest-hit provinces. About 75% more water is falling during the heaviest rainstorms in the region, according to a new scientific analysis. → Read More

NPR

Humans must limit warming to avoid climate tipping points, new study finds

The Earth has already warmed more than 1 degree Celsius. New research suggests that above 1.5 degrees, massive ice melt, ocean current disruptions and coral die-offs are likely. → Read More

NPR

Sweating Buckets... of SCIENCE!

Sweating can be unpleasant, but consider the alternatives: You could roll around in mud. You could spend all day panting. You could have someone whip you up a blood popsicle. Sweating turns out to be pretty essential for human existence, AND arguably less gross than the ways other animals keep from overheating. On today's episode, a small army of NPR science reporters joins host Emily Kwong to… → Read More

NPR

The spending bill will cut emissions, but marginalized groups feel they were sold out

The Inflation Reduction Act is the biggest ever investment to tackle climate change. But there are signs that it could reinforce existing environmental inequalities. → Read More

NPR

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

More than three-quarters of adults in the United States say they've experienced extreme weather in the last five years, according to a nationwide survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. And events like floods, wildfires and hurricanes are emptying bank accounts — especially when insurance doesn't cover the damage. Today on… → Read More

NPR

Because of climate change, inland flooding is becoming more common

The floods in Missouri and Kentucky this week were both caused by extreme rainfall. Climate change is making such rain more common, and driving dangerous floods across much of the U.S. → Read More

NPR

Researchers can now explain how climate change is affecting your weather

For decades, it was impossible to say that a specific weather event was caused, or even made worse, by climate change. But advanced research methods are changing that. → Read More

NPR

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

A majority of people say they have experienced extreme weather in the last five years, according to a nationwide survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. And events like floods, wildfires and hurricanes are emptying bank accounts--especially when insurance can't cover the damage. Aaron Scott talks to science reporter Rebecca… → Read More

NPR

You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

Most Americans have recently been affected by extreme weather and support efforts to protect against future disasters, a new survey finds. And many people suffer long-term financial problems. → Read More

NPR

Eliminating fossil fuel air pollution would save about 50,000 lives, study finds

Burning oil, coal and other fossil fuels releases plumes of tiny, dangerous particles. A new study estimates that eliminating that pollution would save about 50,000 lives in the U.S. each year. → Read More

NPR

The U.S. pledged billions to fight climate change. Then came the Ukraine war

The U.S. promised to slash its emissions and send tens of billions of dollars to low-lying and less well-off nations. The war in Ukraine is delaying that even as the toll from climate change rises. → Read More

NPR

Silver Linings From The UN's Dire Climate Change Report

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) just released the second of three reports on climate change. Nearly 300 scientists from all over the world worked together to create this account of how global warming is affecting our society. NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher fills us in on this major climate science report and actually brings three empowering takeaways… → Read More

NPR

Soot is accelerating snow melt in popular parts of Antarctica, a study finds

Arctic communities have long been plagued by soot that drives snow melt and respiratory disease. Now, humans are making their mark in Antarctica. → Read More

NPR

A new study predicts a huge increase in catastrophic hurricanes for the northeastern U.S.

When hurricanes cause both extreme high tides and heavy rains, devastating floods ensue. Such storms will get much more frequent by the end of the century, according to a new study. → Read More

NPR

Should Big Oil Pick Up The Climate Change Bill?

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals is deciding whether a Baltimore case against more than a dozen oil and gas companies will be heard in state or federal court. The city argues the companies are liable for the local costs of climate change. It wants the case heard in state court, which is governed by robust consumer protection laws. But industry lawyers are fighting hard to have it and more… → Read More

NPR

Climate-driven floods will disproportionately affect Black communities, study finds

Climate change means more flood risk from rising seas, hurricanes and heavy rain. Black communities in the southern U.S. are in the crosshairs, according to a new analysis. → Read More