Alina Selyukh, NPR

Alina Selyukh

NPR

Washington, DC, United States

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Recent:
  • NPR
Past:
  • WBUR
  • KTOO

Recent articles by Alina:

NPR

Restaurants Reinvent Themselves For Thanksgiving And Beyond: 'You Just Pivot'

A Japanese café sells plants and green-tea pie. An Italian restaurant caters a prime-rib dinner. A steak-and-fries chain delivers free meals for the elderly. "Fight or flight," one manager says. → Read More

NPR

Amazon Warehouse Workers In Alabama Petition To Unionize

Warehouse workers in Bessemer, Ala., notify federal labor authorities of plans to hold a unionization vote, teeing up a major labor battle at the retail giant known for its opposition to unionizing. → Read More

NPR

Opening A Hotel During A Pandemic

The U.S. is down around 3.5 million hospitality jobs since the pandemic took hold. But in spite of setbacks, hotels continue to open. → Read More

NPR

Amazon Wants To Sell You Prescription Medications

Amazon launches an online pharmacy, sending shares of CVS, Walgreens and Rite Aid tumbling. Amazon has pushed to compete with Walmart and major pharmacy chains that have long offered home delivery. → Read More

NPR

Shoppers Snap Up Electronics, Aren't Splurging Elsewhere

Shoppers kept buying electronics and home improvement supplies, but sales overall rose only 0.3% in October. → Read More

NPR

Amazon Faces Antitrust Charges From European Regulators

The EU says Amazon exploits data collected from other sellers for its own benefit. These are the first formal charges against the retail giant in a spate of antitrust probes in Europe and the U.S. → Read More

NPR

Drums, Confetti And 'Thank Youse': Philadelphia Parties For Trump's Defeat

Crowds poured into the streets of the city that had gripped the nation's attention for days as Pennsylvania counted the ballots that tipped the presidential election in Joe Biden's favor. → Read More

NPR

These Women Built Careers In Retail. The Pandemic Tore Through Their Stores

Women hold the majority of jobs in clothing and department stores, gift and souvenir shops. They run cash registers everywhere. Now thousands of stores have shuttered, leaving them jobless. → Read More

NPR

In Reversal, Walmart Puts Guns Back On Display

Walmart is returning guns and ammunition back to display shelves after earlier citing "isolated civil unrest" as the reason for temporarily taking them out of view as a safety precaution. → Read More

NPR

When Shoplifting Is A Felony: Retailers Back Harsher Penalties For Store Theft

A new report by the consumer-interest nonprofit Public Citizen calls out major retailers for donating to trade groups and campaigns supporting harsher shoplifting penalties in at least 18 states. → Read More

NPR

Shoppers Came Back To Department Stores In September, Lifting Retail Sales

U.S. retail spending grew 1.9% last month, delivering a slight boost of confidence amid a recent spate of signs that the economic recovery has lost momentum from the pandemic's toll. → Read More

NPR

The Great Fridge Freeze-Out

For months now, there's been a shortage of refrigerators and freezers across the U.S. Shoppers can't find appliances to buy and stores can't find enough appliances to sell. Alina Selyukh joins The Indicator to explain why. → Read More

NPR

It's Not Goodbye, But Not Good Either: Ruby Tuesday Declares Bankruptcy

The chain does "not intend to reopen 185 of their restaurants that were closed during the pandemic," Ruby Tuesday's CEO wrote in a court filing. → Read More

NPR

How Are Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google Monopolies? House Report Counts The Ways

House Democrats recommend Congress look at ways to force the companies to split off some of their businesses, saying the tech giants have exploited their power to benefit themselves and hurt rivals. → Read More

NPR

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

Some shoppers looking to buy new fridges, freezers or washers have been finding themselves out of luck. The coronavirus pandemic has thrown a monkey wrench into both supply and demand. → Read More

NPR

Workers With Disabilities Can Earn Just $3.34 An Hour. Agency Says Law Needs Change

A 1938 law created "exploitative and discriminatory" job programs and should be phased out, marking a new milestone in the debate over "sheltered workshops," the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says. → Read More

NPR

People Are Spending More On Furniture, Clothes, Restaurants And Bars

But U.S. shoppers spent more prudently in August and retail sales grew a tepid 0.6% from July, after extra federal jobless benefits expired and families faced a confusing back-to-school season. → Read More

NPR

Walmart Takes On Amazon Prime: Membership Program Will Deliver From Stores

Walmart+ will cost $98 a year, offering free delivery of groceries and items from nearby stores, a discount on gasoline and mobile checkout. → Read More

NPR

52 Black Former Franchisees Sue McDonald's Alleging Discrimination

The lawsuit says Black franchisees were steered toward neighborhoods where sales are lower while costs are higher. The franchisees ended up with less money and faced harsher scrutiny, it says. → Read More

NPR

Walmart Joins Microsoft In A Bid To Buy TikTok

Walmart cited a potential boost from TikTok to its online presence, including the giant retailer's efforts to grow online advertising and a marketplace for third-party sellers. → Read More