Matthew Francis, Forbes

Matthew Francis

Forbes

Cleveland, OH, United States

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Recent:
  • Unknown
Past:
  • Forbes
  • The Daily Beast
  • Ars Technica
  • Ars Technica UK
  • Slate
  • Scientific American
  • BBC

Past articles by Matthew:

A Black Hole Ate A Star And Left Crumbs Of Light For Astronomers To Discover

Using more than ten years of data, astronomers discovered traces of an unlucky star that got too close to a black hole. Because this event was partly hidden from us by dust, this discovery shows how we might find other cases of star-eating black holes. → Read More

One Big Planet Nine, Or A Swarm Of Small Icy Worlds?

Some small icy worlds in the outer Solar System, including the distant world Sedna, orbit in paths that defy easy explanation. Maybe these worlds were kicked into their orbits by the gravity of many smaller worlds acting together. → Read More

Scientists Check Einstein's Predictions Using Earth Itself As The Laboratory

Einstein's general relativity says experiments should come out the same way, no matter where they are in space and time. A new NIST experiment backs that up, using Earth itself as the lab. → Read More

The Wrinkles On Pluto's Heart Could Be Methane-Ice Dunes

Dunes are common on Earth, Mars, Venus, and Titan. Now researchers think they've found dunes on Pluto, which raises the mystery of how they could form on a world with such a thin atmosphere. → Read More

Strange Asteroid May Be A Permanent Alien Guest

The asteroid known as 2015 BZ509 orbits in a strange pattern. A new explanation says it may be an alien, which was kicked out of another star system and landed in our Solar System billions of years ago. → Read More

The Hidden Depths Of The Dark Cloud Hiding Newborn Stars

A skinny space cloud known as the Dark Doodad may be more like a pancake, helping us learn more about how stars like the Sun form. → Read More

New Mercury Space Probe Will Put Einstein's Gravity To The Test

A joint Japanese-European mission to Mercury could have the bonus effect of letting us test Einstein's theory of relativity to a higher degree than ever before. → Read More

No, Scientists Are Not Smarter Than Non-Scientists

The widespread belief that scientists are brainier than non-scientists is hurtful to everyone who doesn't fit the "scientist" stereotype. → Read More

Plotting The Three-Dimensional Dance Of Galaxies

Astronomers used the Gaia space telescope to create a 3D map of nearly 90 objects orbiting the Milky Way, which will tell us about dark matter and the history of our galaxy. → Read More

Are We Closer to Finding a Fifth Dimension?

The discovery of gravitational waves toppled what we thought we knew about dimensions. → Read More

How Astronomers Could Discover Oceans on Distant Planets

Planets too far away to photograph could yield some clues to whether water—and maybe even life—could exist. → Read More

“Life, uh, finds a way”—Applying lessons from evolution to go to Mars

Biomimicry looks to living organisms to create the future of sustainable engineering. → Read More

‘Dwarfquakes’ Reveal the Future of Our Universe

Dying stars were an enigma—until an astronomer measured seismic shifts on them, giving us clues about the sun’s future and the expansion rate of the universe. → Read More

Is Space Becoming a Gold Mine?

A new law grants private companies ownership over the materials they extract from asteroids or the Moon. But don’t call it a gold rush just yet. → Read More

Does Pluto Have Ice Volcanoes?

That’s what some scientists believe. And it might have a heart, too. → Read More

If we met new life—on this planet or the next—would we know it when we saw it?

Can day trips at some lake in Canada help us on Mars down the line? → Read More

If we met new life—on this planet or the next—would we know it when we saw it?

Can day trips at some lake in Canada help us on Mars down the line? → Read More

Glueballs are the missing frontier of the Standard Model

There should be particles made entirely of gluons, but we don't know how to find them. → Read More

Glueballs are the missing frontier of the Standard Model

There should be particles made entirely of gluons, but we don't know how to find them. → Read More

Meet Claudia Alexander, NASA Badass Who Never Got Her Due

In a field dominated by white men, Claudia Alexander was a pioneer. → Read More