Allison Aubrey, WFAE

Allison Aubrey

WFAE

Washington, DC, United States

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Recent:
  • WFAE
  • WGBH
Past:
  • 90.1FM WABE
  • NPR
  • 88.5 WFDD
  • WBUR
  • TPR News
  • knkx public radio
  • Iowa Public Radio
  • MPR News
  • 90.5 WESA
  • KERA News
  • and more…

Recent articles by Allison:

The FDA proposes new targets to limit lead in baby food

Toxic metal can be harmful to developing brains. New lead targets are part of a broad FDA imitative to reduce children's exposure to the lowest levels possible. → Read More

Sitting all day can be deadly. 5-minute walks can offset harms

If you sit at your computer all day and then lounge on the sofa for more screen time in the evening, your health can take a hit. A body of evidence links sedentary lifestyles to an increased risk of diabetes, dementia and death from heart disease. → Read More

Time is fleeting. Here's how to stay on track with New Year's goals

As we dive into another new year of resolutions, managing time is the key to success. And learning to organize our time around our goals may mean saying 'no' to activities that don't align. → Read More

NPR

A Taste Of Lab-Grown Meat

The idea came to Uma Valeti while he was working on regrowing human tissue to help heart attack patients: If we can grow tissue from cells in a lab, why not use animal cells to grow meat? Food production accounts for as much as a third of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. The idea behind cultivated meat is to help feed the world while dramatically reducing human contributions to global… → Read More

FDA gives safety nod to 'no kill' meat, bringing it closer to sale in the U.S.

The FDA has taken a first step toward green-lighting cultivated meat. The agency gave a safety nod to Upside Foods, which provided documentation to show their meat grown from animal cells is safe. → Read More

NPR

From science fiction to reality, 'no kill' meat may be coming soon

The meat of the future may be cultured directly from animal cells without slaughtering livestock. It's not yet sold in the U.S., but NPR got a tour of a leading start-up and a taste of their chicken. → Read More

From science fiction to reality, 'no kill' meat may be coming soon

The meat of the future may be cultured directly from animal cells without slaughtering livestock. It's not yet sold in the U.S., but NPR got a tour of a leading start-up and a taste of their chicken. → Read More

NPR

Statins vs. supplements: New study finds one is 'vastly superior' to cut cholesterol

Millions of people are prescribed statins to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease, but many would rather take supplements instead. A new study shows statins are much more effective. → Read More

Statins vs. supplements: New study finds one is 'vastly superior' to cut cholesterol

Millions of people are prescribed statins to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease, but many would rather take supplements instead. A new study shows statins are much more effective. → Read More

NPR

Should Daylight Saving Time Be Permanent?

Correspondent Allison Aubrey talks to host Emily Kwong about the pros and cons of adopting permanent Daylight Saving Time or year-round Standard Time. → Read More

NPR

Many products by the largest food firms are considered unhealthy, research shows

Two new reports paint a dismal picture of nutrition in the U.S. One finds about 70% of products sold by the largest food companies are unhealthy. Investor groups are pushing for change. → Read More

NPR

For stomach pain and other IBS symptoms, new apps can bring relief

If you often have pain, bloating, urgency or other symptoms of gastrointestinal distress, you may have IBS. Here's how to find relief, using the latest science and a new generation of apps. → Read More

NPR

Colonoscopies save lives. Doctors push back against European study that casts doubt

Colon cancer specialists worry that results of a study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine could be misconstrued, and keep patients from getting lifesaving cancer screening. → Read More

Colonoscopies save lives. Doctors push back against European study that casts doubt

Colon cancer specialists worry that results of a study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine could be misconstrued, and keep patients from getting lifesaving cancer screening. → Read More

NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

Research finds five to 10 minutes daily of a type of strength training for muscles used in breathing can help anyone reduce or prevent high blood pressure. The training can also help elite athletes. → Read More

NPR

When Should I Get My Omicron Booster Shot?

Updated COVID boosters are now available that target the Omicron subvariant and many Americans 12 and older are eligible for the shot. Host Emily Kwong and health correspondent Allison Aubrey talk about who should get it, when, and whether there's a case to be made for skipping this booster. You can read more about Allison's reporting at "Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?" Follow… → Read More

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

Updated COVID boosters are now available for anyone age 12 or older. The CDC is urging anyone who is eligible to sign up but some vaccine experts say some people might want to wait. → Read More

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

Updated COVID boosters are now available for anyone age 12 or older. → Read More

NPR

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

Updated COVID boosters are now available for anyone age 12 or older. The CDC is urging anyone who is eligible to sign up but some vaccine experts say some people might want to wait. → Read More

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

Updated COVID boosters are now available for anyone age 12 or older. The CDC is urging anyone who is eligible to sign up but some vaccine experts say some people might want to wait. → Read More