Rachel Treisman, NPR

Rachel Treisman

NPR

Washington, DC, United States

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Recent:
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Past:
  • Yale Daily News
  • Pittsburgh news now

Recent articles by Rachel:

NPR

Damage from Hurricane Ian cuts Sanibel Island off from Florida's mainland

Hurricane Ian washed away several portions of the Sanibel Causeway, a series of bridges linking the island to the rest of the state. It will require structural rebuilds, Florida's governor says. → Read More

NPR

How to prepare for and stay safe during a power outage

Millions of Floridians are without power in the wake of Hurricane Ian, which now has its sights set on South Carolina. Here are some do's and don'ts of blackout safety. → Read More

NPR

Lizzo played James Madison's crystal flute onstage in D.C., proving history rocks

The Library of Congress had invited Lizzo to check out its flute collection during her tour stop. On Tuesday, she played a few notes on the historic instrument, twerked and declared history cool. → Read More

NPR

This is what NASA's spacecraft saw just seconds before slamming into an asteroid

NASA successfully crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid on Monday night. These are the final images it captured as it hurtled toward the rocky surface. → Read More

NPR

Floridians in the hurricane's path don't need to go far to get to safety, mayors say

St. Petersburg and Tampa are preparing for what could be their first direct hit by a major hurricane in over a century. Officials there are urging people to comply with evacuation orders immediately. → Read More

NPR

He spent decades recording soundscapes. Now they're going to the Library of Congress

Jim Metzner has traveled far and wide to record sounds of the world and share them with listeners. The Library of Congress will preserve thousands of tapes and other items dating back to the 1970s. → Read More

NPR

Away from the mourning crowds, some Londoners say they hope the monarchy will change

In Peckham, about a 30-minute drive from the center of London, many people were going about their weekend as usual. While they're sad about the queen's death, they see it as an opportunity for reform. → Read More

NPR

Fans are camping out ahead of the queen's funeral, braving the crowds and the chaos

Dozens of groups had set up tents, sleeping bags, folding chairs and pizza box towers along the blocked-off street where Queen Elizabeth II's casket will travel for the funeral procession. → Read More

NPR

People are mourning Queen Elizabeth — and buying lots of commemorative merchandise

Gift shops in London are selling souvenirs marking the queen's death, everything from shirts, mugs, posters and more with messages like "Gone but not forgotten" and "Forever in our hearts." → Read More

NPR

In the line to see Queen Elizabeth II, mourners make history and friends

Thousands of people have been lining up in London to see Queen Elizabeth II lying in state. They say the 10+ hour wait is worth it to thank the queen for her service — and can even be pretty fun. → Read More

NPR

Cynt Marshall, the NBA's first Black female CEO, recounts her journey in a new memoir

You've Been Chosen is a look at the personal and professional events that have shaped who Marshall is today, from adopting kids to surviving cancer to rising through the corporate ranks. → Read More

NPR

Basketball icon Sue Bird plays her last game after two legendary decades in the WNBA

The Seattle Storm lost its semifinal game on Tuesday, bringing a bittersweet end to what the 41-year-old had said would be her final season. She retires as the winningest WNBA player of all time. → Read More

NPR

Eebbers, TSA's oldest and cutest bomb-sniffing dog, retires after a decade of service

The 11-year-old vizsla-Labrador mix screened passengers at a Minnesota airport and helped with security at major sporting events. He celebrated his last day at work with toys, cake and pets. → Read More

NPR

Remembering Marilyn Loden, who gave a name to the glass ceiling

When Loden first uttered the phrase "the glass ceiling" in the 1970s, she hoped the invisible barrier for women that it described would soon become a thing of the past. She died last month at age 76. → Read More

NPR

Twitter says it's testing an edit button — after years of clamoring from users

Twitter says it is testing out the feature internally before rolling it out to Twitter Blue subscribers. It will allow users to edit tweets several times within 30 minutes of posting them. → Read More

NPR

J.K. Rowling's new book, about a transphobe who faces wrath online, raises eyebrows

In The Ink Black Heart, a popular cartoonist is harassed and killed after her work is criticized as transphobic. Observers say the plot mirrors Rowling's experience, though she calls it a coincidence. → Read More

NPR

Princess Diana showed the world how to use celebrity for good

Diana, Princess of Wales, was known for championing humanitarian causes and redefining celebrity. She died 25 years ago today. → Read More

NPR

No, that wasn't Beyoncé at the U.S. Open. It was Laverne Cox, and she's flattered

At least one viewer watching at home thought they spotted Beyoncé in the star-studded stands at Serena Williams' U.S. Open match Monday night. Cox, who "worships" the singer, took it in stride. → Read More

NPR

Nichelle Nichols' remains will go explore strange new worlds

A portion of the trailblazing actor's ashes will travel to deep space later this year. Along for the journey are remains of the show's creator and another star from the series. → Read More

NPR

A Florida district declines dictionary donations as it navigates a new book law

A local Rotary Club and nonprofit have given dictionaries to Sarasota, Fla., schools for over a decade. The district declined this year amidst amidst a book freeze while it navigates a new state law. → Read More