Sebastien Malo, Reuters Top News

Sebastien Malo

Reuters Top News

New York, NY, United States

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Recent:
  • Reuters Top News
Past:
  • World Economic Forum
  • PoliticusUSA
  • allAfrica.com
  • Thomson Reuters Fdn
  • YubaNet
  • InterAksyon
  • Daily Mail Online
  • AOL.com
  • The Peninsula
  • HuffPost
  • and more…

Recent articles by Sebastien:

As sea levels rise, homes continue to sprout in US flood zones

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - New homes are going up fastest in high-flood risk areas in many U.S. coastal states, scientists said on Wednesday, despite increasing awareness that global warming has made living in such areas even more risky. → Read More

Meeting climate goals would cut U.S. city heat deaths, Miami ahead

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The U.S. city of Miami would be the biggest winner if global warming is kept to internationally agreed limits, averting a greater share of projected deaths from extreme heat than other large American cities, scientists said on Wednesday. → Read More

Children could influence their parents views on climate change

North Carolinian teens and children have been shown to have an influencing effect on their parents' own views on environmental issues and climate change. → Read More

Children may be their parents’ best climate-change teachers especially with conservative parents

In the study, parents whose middle school-age children followed a curriculum that included learning about climate change increased their own level of concern by nearly 23 percent on average, the researchers found. For conservative parents, the rise was significantly higher, averaging 28 percent. → Read More

In first, New York caps climate emissions from buildings

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - New York's skyline is getting a green makeover under a bill adopted on Thursday that imposes massive cuts to the planet-warming greenhouse gases the city's high rises and other large buildings emit. → Read More

In first, New York caps climate emissions from buildings

NEW YORK, April 18 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - New York’s skyline is getting a green makeover under a bill adopted on Thursday that imposes massive cuts to the planet-warming greenhouse gases the city’s high rises and other large buildings emit. If signed into law by the mayor of the United States’ largest city, the measure will mandate that buildings over 25,000 square feet (2,300 square… → Read More

As sea levels rise, UN climbs aboard floating-cities push

A UN-backed partnership will study the futuristic prospect of floating cities, looking at how platforms at sea might help bail out coastal cities at risk of flooding due to climate change. → Read More

Africa: As Sea Levels Rise, UN Climbs Aboard Floating-Cities Push

Some have also warned the cities may end up being only for the ultra-rich → Read More

Africa: 'Come With a Plan,' UN Chief Tells States Ahead of Climate Summit

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told governments to come to a September summit with concrete plans to boost climate action, as he released a flagship report on global warming by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on Thursday. → Read More

'Come with a plan,' U.N. chief tells states ahead of climate summit

UNITED NATIONS (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told governments to come to a September summit with concrete plans to boost climate action, as he released a flagship report on global warming by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on Thursday. → Read More

Americans in cool states misjudge threat from rising heat waves

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Americans most at risk from more frequent and intense heat waves tend to misjudge the deadly dangers hot spells can pose to their health, scientists said on Tuesday. → Read More

US faces fresh water shortages due to climate change, research says

Increasing population and rising temperatures will have a serious impact on US fresh water supply, prompting researchers to warn of severe shortages in the future. → Read More

Return of the milkman? How one grocery business is going packaging-free

The Wally Shop provided packaging-free grocery deliveries to the people of Brooklyn. → Read More

'Alarm' over climate change in US doubles in five years

The proportion of Americans found to be "alarmed" by climate change has doubled in five years, the pollsters behind a nationwide survey revealed on Tuesday. → Read More

Africa: Russia and China Back Nuclear As a Clean-Power Fix for Africa

Impatient to boost electricity supplies for homes and businesses alike, Ethiopia and other African nations are doing deals paving the way to nuclear power plants → Read More

In first, Native American tribe displaced by sea gets land to relocate

"Lots of people (worldwide) are contemplating moving communities that are going under water" By Sebastien Malo NEW YORK, Jan 10 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A small Native American tribe in Louisiana whose land has nearly vanished into the sea has moved a step closer to relocating its community further inland after authorities acquired new land for the move, part of a first-of-its-kind… → Read More

Mali: In Warming Mali, Weather Forecasts Help Cool Flaring Tempers

Baba Coulibaly, a farmer in Mali, knows just how bitter disputes over food and fodder can become in a time of worsening drought. → Read More

Human rights protection hangs in balance at UN climate talks

One sticking point at U.N. climate talks is how obligations on human rights should be incorporated into the → Read More

This US state is turning millions of oyster shells into artificial reefs

The state of Louisiana has lost more than 4,700 square km of land since the 1930s, and it's feared another 5,800 square km could go in the next half century. → Read More

Air pollution is the world's top killer, according to new research

Burning fossil fuels is shortening lives globally by almost two years, a new study has found. → Read More